Are You Prepared for What Lies Beneath?

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By Richard K. Noots

One poor diver has brought us his last bit of the art idea he started. You see, he had a penchant for taking photos that were half underwater. Unfortunately, no one told him that the ocean is quite dangerous, and he has since gone missing … Alright, I’m kidding. You can check out his photo collection here. Don’t be alarmed though, even if you aren’t near water some of these photos can get your heart racing a little.

Matty Smith is never scared.
don't be scared croc

I had discovered from previous visits to dive this small bay that after strong summer northeast winds hundreds of bluebottle cnidarian are blown in and trapped, they float around the bay on the tides and sometimes clump together in huge rafts. I began planning this shot because knew that the blueness of these animals lights up wonderfully with a strobe and figured the sun would rise somewhere in the background towards the mouth of the bay. I thought that orange and the blue would make a striking shot. It took quite a few early mornings and lots of lighting experiments to make this image, but in the end I’m very happy with it.
I had discovered from previous visits to dive this small bay that after strong summer northeast winds hundreds of bluebottle cnidarian are blown in and trapped, they float around the bay on the tides and sometimes clump together in huge rafts. I began planning this shot because knew that the blueness of these animals lights up wonderfully with a strobe and figured the sun would rise somewhere in the background towards the mouth of the bay. I thought that orange and the blue would make a striking shot. It took quite a few early mornings and lots of lighting experiments to make this image, but in the end I’m very happy with it.
Physalia physalis (bluebottle) taken as an over/under image in Bushrangers Bay, NSW Australia. After strong NE winds hundreds of these zooids were blown into the bays around Shellharbour and trapped overnight. Post processing is limited to colour temp and small amounts of burning. Also slightly cropped.
Physalia physalis (bluebottle) taken as an over/under image in Bushrangers Bay, NSW Australia. After strong NE winds hundreds of these zooids were blown into the bays around Shellharbour and trapped overnight. Post processing is limited to colour temp and small amounts of burning. Also slightly cropped.
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Look at the contrast.
look at the contrast

Minding their own business.
minding their own business

They look happy …
they look happy